All that Glitters is Rose Gold

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If there’s ever a popular color for the decade, it’s rose gold.

Rose Gold is actually a copper and gold alloy. The copper content in the alloy actually gives the alloy its reddish/pinkish color. Over the years, the alloy has earned itself several names. In the 1800s, it was known as Russian gold thanks to its roots in Russia, although that term is now obsolete.

Although it is now extremely popular, during the 20th Century, the alloy actually dropped out of favor for white and yellow gold alloys. It wasn’t until the last decade that rose gold began to come back into popular culture in both jewelry and watches.

In general, the higher the copper content, the darker red the alloy in jewelry. Now, in watches, that formula starts to get thrown out of the window. Traditionally soft and malleable, rose gold can be highly prone to scratching in the right conditions. In order to combat this issue, companies like Omega and Hublot have created ceramic/rose gold alloys.

Omega's Ceragold has a deeper, darker color as opposed to Breitling's more traditional yellow gold color. This is due both to the Ceragold creation process and the  difference between Breitilng & Omega's metallurgy processes.

Omega’s Ceragold has a deeper, darker color as opposed to Breitling’s more traditional yellow gold color. This is due both to the Ceragold creation process and the difference between Breitilng & Omega’s metallurgy processes.

Similar in philosophy to Omega’s Liquidmetal alloy, Ceragold and other ceramic and gold alloys take out the worry of scratching rose gold watches and jewelry. What happens with a ceramic/rose gold alloy creation process is the formation of a ceramic blank that is then electroformed with the rose gold.

What the heck is electroforming?

Electroforming is a process of coating metal through the electrodeposition process where positive charge is sent through nickel and negative charge is sent through the form or “Mandrel.” All of this is done in a highly-conductive Electrolytic Solution. The difference in polarity of metals sends the metal plating to the mandrel, in the case of an Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean’s bezel covering a ceramic blank with rose gold.

As a result of this process, you get a bezel or a case that is extremely scratch resistant and, in many cases, different in color from its purer rose gold counterparts. That’s just for ceramic gold.

The JLC Duometre is again, lighter in color than the reddish Omega.

The JLC Duometre is again, lighter in color than the reddish Omega.

Rose gold vs. Rose gold

Ceramics aren’t the only game in town when it comes to rose gold. There is a rainbow of colors underneath the rose gold banner. Just in the four walls of Burdeen’s Jewelry, we have several different variations of Red Gold/Rose Gold/Honey Gold.

Every watch company has their own proprietary color. We’ve set up a nice assortment of some of the most well-known watches to show the differences in color between the rose golds. So when non-jewelry people think of the words “rose gold,” they may think of the pink on their iPhone; jewelry people may think of the honey-ish color on their jewelry; but watch people have a myriad of colors to choose from as each and every watch company has their own color to differentiate themselves from the competition.

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